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As we reflect on 2022, we’re proud of this achievement, but know there is much work to do to address the global water crisis. Our continued focus is critical in bringing clean energy and water to the billions of people who need it most.

Our GivePartners and the gracious support of thousands of other donors, big and small, make our work possible. In 2022, we grew our project deployments by 170%, building 45 new solar projects around the globe including 5 new Solar Water Farms in Kenya. Our 10 SWF’s now supply clean water for up to 200,000 people every day. We also completed 9 Solar Impact Projects in Colombia, Nepal, the DRC, Mexico, Botswana and Haiti. And on top of that, 293 volunteers were escorted on 31 life-changing treks to build projects in Colombia, Nepal and the Philippines.

Mwingi – Solar Water Farm Mobi+

Mwingi is a small town about 120 miles east of the capital city, Nirobi. A prolonged drought has made water access a nightmare, forcing residents to trek many kilometers in order to get clean, drinkable water. With the deployment of our new Mobi+, we’ll now provide up to 15,000 liters of clean water a day for this worthy community.

Mtongwe – Solar Water Farm Max

Mtongwe is an underprivileged coastal community in the Mombasa area. Though Mombasa is the country’s second largest city and home to one of Kenya’s two naval bases, many Mtongwe residents lack access to reliable power and fresh water. Situated a few kilometers away from our Likoni Max, the GivePower site teams will work together to maximize distribution in the area providing access to clean drinking water for up to 70,000 people a day.

Thank you to Titan Solar Power for fully funding the Mtongwe Max.

GivePower’s Solar Water Farm Max in Haiti Provided 240,000 Liters Of Clean Water to Those Suffering From a Deadly Cholera Outbreak

In the wake of paralyzing fuel shortages severely inhibiting the transport of clean water in Haiti, a deadly cholera outbreak was identified in October. Clean water was needed urgently on the mainland to contain the disease. Our existing Max on the island of La Gonave was uniquely positioned to help. GivePower received invaluable support from Amazon, which donated 20,000 reusable water bags, The United Nations Humanitarian Air Services (UNHAS), which transported the bags, and Health Through Walls, which facilitated deliveries of water to over 12,000 of those most vulnerable to the disease. Over 240,000 liters of clean water were distributed over a 6-week period.

Thank you to Lyndon & Maddie Rive and Endless Network for their generous support of this life-saving effort.

Solar-Powered Recycling Center in Juanchaco, Colombia

EcoPazifico, a local non-profit that promotes recycling efforts in Colombia, has been working with the village of Juanchaco to develop a trash for cash program to help clean up the environment, improve livelihoods, and turn waste into a resource. In November, we were able to complete construction of a community-run, solar-powered recycling center and provided recycling machinery as well as a solar microgrid impacting over 1,400 people so far.

Thank you to Enfragen, MUFG Union Bank Foundation and the Glenfarne Group for making this project possible.

Solarizing Rural Boat Travel in Miramar, Colombia

In Miramar, families spend up to 60% of their income on fuel costs to get their children to school. In partnership with the Universidad de los Andes, GivePower provided solar power for school boat travel and sustainable transportation solutions for local fishermen. This significantly reduced the community’s reliance on diesel and in turn provided access to education without financial sacrifice. The project provided new boats with Torqeedo engines and solar-powered charging stations. Over 400 people’s lives were changed.

Thank you to Enfragen and the Glenfarne Group for making this project possible.

We are grateful for your support and partnership in making a positive impact in the lives of those who need our help the most. Our founding GivePartner, GoodLeap, funds 100% of our administrative costs. That means every additional dollar you give goes directly to a project in the field. With your donation to GivePower, together, we can continue to provide clean energy solutions around the world.


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What are Deep Cycle Batteries?

Deep cycle batteries are a type of rechargeable battery that are designed to be discharged and recharged multiple times. They are commonly used in a variety of applications, including solar power systems, wind power systems, and electric vehicles.

Deep cycle batteries are different from starting batteries (also called SLI batteries), which are designed to deliver a high current for a short period of time, like starting an engine. Deep cycle batteries, on the other hand, are designed to deliver a lower current over a longer period of time, making them ideal for applications where the battery is regularly discharged and recharged.

The most common types of deep cycle batteries are lead-acid batteries, which are widely used in a variety of applications. They are relatively inexpensive, durable, and easy to maintain, however they have a lower energy density compared to other types of batteries, and they are not as efficient in high-temperature environments. Another type of deep cycle batteries are Lithium-ion batteries, which have a higher energy density and they are more efficient in high-temperature environments, but they are more expensive and have a shorter lifespan than lead-acid batteries.

Battleborn direct replacement battery 50Ah 24v LiFePO4 Deep Cycle Batt – Volts energies

When it comes to deep cycle batteries, it’s important to choose the right type of battery for your specific application. Factors to consider include the depth of discharge (the amount of the battery’s capacity that will be used before recharging), the number of cycles the battery is expected to undergo, and the environment in which the battery will be used.

It’s also important to properly maintain deep cycle batteries, by keeping them clean, fully charged and at the right temperature. This will ensure that they last as long as possible and perform at their best.

In conclusion, deep cycle batteries are a type of rechargeable battery that are designed to be discharged and recharged multiple times. They are commonly used in solar power systems, wind power systems, and electric vehicles. The most common types of deep cycle batteries are lead-acid batteries and lithium-ion batteries. It’s important to choose the right type of battery for your specific application and properly maintain the batteries to ensure they last as long as possible.

What’s “Off-Grid Living”?

Off-grid living refers to the practice of living independently from the traditional power grid by generating one’s own electricity, water, and other necessities. This can be achieved through a variety of methods, such as solar power, wind power, hydropower, and even alternative energy solutions like biomass or geothermal.

One of the main benefits of off-grid living is the ability to be self-sufficient and not rely on the power grid or other public utilities. This can be especially appealing for those who live in remote or rural areas where access to the power grid is limited. Additionally, off-grid living can also be a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly lifestyle choice, as it reduces the dependence on fossil fuels and reduces the carbon footprint.

Off-Grid Solar System - Off-Grid Solar Kit | Unbound Solar

However, off-grid living also has its challenges. It can be costly to set up and maintain an off-grid system, and it requires a significant level of knowledge and expertise to install and maintain the system. Additionally, off-grid living often means living with limited resources and without the luxury of modern conveniences such as air conditioning, dishwashers, or other high-energy-consuming appliances.

In order to successfully live off-grid, it’s important to carefully plan and design the system. It’s also important to be aware of local regulations, as there may be legal restrictions or permit requirements for installing off-grid systems.

In conclusion, off-grid living is the practice of living independently from the traditional power grid by generating one’s own electricity, water, and other necessities. This can be achieved through a variety of methods such as solar power, wind power, hydropower, and alternative energy solutions. Living off-grid offers the benefits of self-sufficiency and sustainability but also comes with its own set of challenges like cost, maintenance, and limited resources. It is important to plan and design the system accordingly and be aware of local regulations.

A green machine: New Brunswicker uses solar to power his electric pickup truck

‘There’s probably going to be a huge demand in the future’

A red Ford truck parked next to an angled collection of solar panels. There are orange trees in the background.

 

A future landscape for many might include an electric vehicle powered by a solar grid that can run electricity for a home when the power goes out.

But it’s not that futuristic for one New Brunswick man. In fact, it’s his reality.

Cory Allen, who lives in Nasonworth, N.B., switched to electric vehicles in 2019, beginning with an SUV.

He said he still had a gas car in the garage at the time because, like many people, he was skeptical.

More recently, he got an electric pickup truck, the Ford F-150 Lightning. He said it has some “really cool” features, including being able to “back feed” electricity into the house.

In the event of a power outage, Allen’s automatic standby generator would kick in, which he said would cost around $6 or $7 per hour to run.

But then he could go to the garage and flick a transfer switch that would allow the truck to power the house. He said the truck can power the house for around two days before needing a charge.

A man wearing a navy blue collared shirt standing in front of a mountain landscape

Not only that but the truck is charged using solar energy.

Allen had a 12.8-kilowatt array of solar panels installed that feed into the garage where vehicles are charged. He said the truck takes around eight hours to go from zero power to a full charge.

He said he went with a grid-tied solar system for his home, which is different than a standard setup, so there’s no battery component.

He said when the vehicles are charging, they will take all of the solar energy that’s being produced. But when they are not actively using all of the solar energy, the meter will run backward and the power will be banked for when they need it, Allen said.

His panels are on a wooden frame in the field by his house. That was more cost-effective than putting them on the roof of his home since the field has a better southern exposure, which means increased sunlight.

Not a lot of public knowledge

The idea for the setup originally came from Epic Energy, a New Brunswick solar energy company, when Allen approached them about a solar array.

“The electrician came over and we began talking and … he just offered so many of these awesome ideas,” said Allen.

Richard Knappe, president of Epic Energy, said there isn’t a lot of public knowledge about using solar to power electric vehicles, but they have had conversations with interested clients.

He said there also aren’t many vehicles that have the necessary technology.

“There’s probably going to be a huge demand in the future,” said Knappe. “But right now, we’re pretty limited to the F-150 Ford, and the Hyundai IONIQ 5.”

When it comes to setting up these types of systems, the wiring does get pretty complicated, he said. Knappe has an electrician who does this work, but he said it is hard to find electricians with that particular knowledge.

Long-term financial benefit

Allen said having an electric vehicle is also a long-term financial benefit for him.

He said the truck is expensive upfront at roughly $100,000. Then there is around $11,000 for the solar array and about $7,000 for the electrical work.

But the cost makes sense in the long run, Allen said.

He said as a small business owner who travels a lot, he was spending a lot on gas to fuel a pickup truck.

But without having to buy gas, he said his monthly payments come out to less since he’s only making payments on the truck.

Allen said one of the things that makes him feel good about his setup is the carbon footprint.

He said there is a heavy carbon footprint at the outset for the production of electric vehicles and solar panels. But, after using them for around five years, he said his household could be net zero.

He said environmental concerns are always something he tries to keep on top of his mind.

“I often joked, ‘Well, at least I’m offsetting the gas I put through the truck with the car,'” said Allen. “But now we have the electric car and the truck, so I don’t even have to worry about that joke anymore.”

Alberta is in a solar power gold rush — and there are lessons for the rest of Canada

People congregate in front of a solar power array in Alberta on a sunny day.

Growing up near Fort McMurray, Alta., Randall Benson started working in the oilsands like many of his family members. However, in the mid-1990s, the long hours and ecological impacts of the industry had him rethinking his occupation.

“I just found it counterintuitive to how I was raised to respect our environment, and so I made a decision to find something that was kind of the opposite,” said Benson, now 52.

The “opposite” turned out to be solar energy, which he learned about while flipping through a magazine after moving to Edmonton.

About 25 years later, Benson is pleased to see utility-scale solar projects booming — a welcome addition to the residential and community solar installations his company, Gridworks Energy, builds. Benson is working on a project commissioned by the Métis Nation of Alberta, of which he is a member, designed to generate enough power for 1,200 homes.

It’s part of a renewable energy boom in a province world-famous for its oil reserves.

There’s “almost gold rush-level activity for solar” in Alberta, said Sara Hastings-Simon, assistant professor at the University of Calgary and an expert in energy and climate policy. “The majority of solar that we have in the system in Alberta today was installed in 2021-2022. So this is a really very recent phenomenon.”

According to research by Hastings-Simon and colleagues, in 2021, renewables — solar, wind, and hydro combined — accounted for 14.3 percent of electricity on the Alberta grid, compared to less than three per cent in 2002. She expects that number to increase in 2022.

Hastings-Simon said multiple factors helped create the conditions for this growth in solar power.

Alberta and Ontario are the only Canadian provinces with deregulated wholesale energy markets. While a government with a regulated electricity market could decide to build renewables, Hastings-Simon said that a deregulated system allows for these projects to move forward because of open competition among energy suppliers and an easy route for companies to purchase renewable power directly.

The Alberta Electric System Operator is a not-for-profit organization that purchases power from an open market; the price of electricity changes hourly, set by supply and demand, Hastings-Simon said.

According to Natural Resources Canada, Alberta — in particular the south of the province — has great potential for solar power generation. Despite the vast resource and an open market, solar development was stuck in a bit of a “chicken-and-egg” situation, without anything to kick-start projects, said Hastings-Simon.

When NDP Leader Rachel Notley was premier, the province started a renewable electricity program, and while only wind projects were selected, it sent a message to corporate buyers that a renewable energy market was starting to take off in the province.

In 2018, the province put out a request for solar projects to power Alberta government facilities. This “helped to break that chicken-and-egg cycle,” said Hastings-Simon. The provincial government’s renewable energy procurement in turn sparked an “uptick in the interest of so-called non-utility procurement.”

In other words, instead of buying electricity from their utility, more companies and organizations are opting to work directly with renewable energy developers to secure electricity at a guaranteed price. This also works out well for renewable energy developers, who have to contend with variable rates when they sell power to the province.

For some companies, there was another incentive: under the federal carbon tax, solar can be used as an offset in order to comply with the cost of carbon pollution.

With the price of solar energy itself dropping, the effect was “the perfect storm” for a boom in solar development, said Hastings-Simon.

Much of the growth is happening in southern Alberta. That includes Canada’s largest solar farm to date, the Travers Solar Project in Vulcan County, which signed an agreement to sell electricity directly to Amazon.

The burst of solar activity has been welcome financially for Vulcan County. In recent years, some fossil fuel companies have walked away from properties, leaving outstanding tax bills unpaid, resulting in the county cutting its budget by 30 percent, said the county’s reeve, Jason Schneider.

According to Schneider, tax from renewable energy projects makes up 45 percent of the county’s revenue: about 25 percent of which is solar and 20 percent wind.

“It subsidizes everything,” he said. “It’s paying for libraries, it’s paying for roads, it’s paying for bridges.”

Hastings-Simon said the next hurdle the province may face will be keeping up with the capacity for solar projects to connect to the grid.

She points to Texas as an example of how to proceed. With lots of solar potentials, the state decided to “build transmission lines on the assumption that if we build it, developers will come and build renewable projects when they have that opportunity to interconnect [to the grid].”

When it comes to where public money can best be put to use to keep solar’s momentum going, she said transmission lines are “the biggest bang for the buck.”

 

Credits

Nova Scotia Power ‘working to resolve’ backlog of solar installation permits

The frontlines of solar energy say Nova Scotia Power is pushing their industry to a breaking point because of a backlog in permit approvals for hundreds of installations. The utility says it’s working diligently to get through the delay and is committed to green energy but opposition parties say that’s not the message they’re sending.

Nova Scotia’s solar energy sector went public this week with concerns over Nova Scotia Power’s processing time for solar installation permits.

“Huge demand for solar among Nova Scotians but we risk losing the summer install season with close to 1000 projects stalled,” Solar Nova Scotia tweeted on May 18, 2022.

For their part, the public utility says it is dealing with a backlog but it’s committed to working through it.

“Since January, we have processed approx. 650 electrical permitting requests and acknowledge that there continues to be a backlog which we are working to resolve as quickly as possible,” Stacy O’Rourke, Nova Scotia Power’s communications director, wrote in an email statement.

O’Rourke wrote that the utility is committed to phasing out coal and that processing permits for solar installations is a priority.

“Nova Scotia is not incentivized to bring on renewables at all, let alone in a timely fashion, and that’s a big problem,” said Claudia Chender, the Nova Scotia NDP critic for natural resources and renewables.

Chender says Nova Scotia Power’s attempt to charge solar customers a connection fee earlier this year demonstrates the need for the provincial government to reform how the utility is regulated.

“So that there’s a service standard for solar installation. So, that they’re incentivized differently not just for selling power but also for meeting our environmental targets and getting us towards renewables,” she said.

Tory Rushton, Nova Scotia’s minister of natural resources and renewables, says regulation changes are a possibility.

“I’ve been very clear right from day one, there’s nothing off the table. We made some amendments to the acts during the recent legislative sitting. We’re in the middle of regulations. This is an open file,” he said.

Rushton says the high demand from homeowners to have solar panels installed is a positive sign in Nova Scotia’s pathway to phasing out coal.

“I understand from comments made on social media from Solar Nova Scotia that there’s a high-interest rate so that’s a good thing. And we encourage Nova Scotia Power to move these things forward,” he said.

Solar For Boats & RV’s

Solar power is an increasingly popular choice for powering boats and RVs, as it is a clean, renewable, and cost-effective alternative to traditional fossil fuels.

Solar panels, also known as photovoltaic (PV) panels, convert sunlight into electricity that can be used to power appliances, lights, and other electrical devices on a boat or RV. The size and power of the solar panels will depend on the specific needs of the boat or RV, as well as the amount of sunlight the panels will receive.

One of the key benefits of using solar power on a boat or RV is the ability to be off-grid. This means that a boat or RV can be parked in a remote location and still have access to power, without the need to rely on a generator or shore power. Additionally, solar power is silent and produces no emissions, which makes it a great choice for boating and RVing in sensitive or protected areas.

Solar power systems for boats and RVs typically include the solar panels, a charge controller, and a battery bank. The charge controller is responsible for ensuring that the batteries are not overcharged or undercharged, while the battery bank stores the electricity generated by the solar panels.

When it comes to solar power for boats and RVs, there are different options for the solar panel, such as flexible or semi-flexible solar panels, which are easy to install and can be attached to curved surfaces such as the deck or cabin of a boat, or traditional rigid solar panels which are more powerful but not as adaptable.

In conclusion, solar power is a clean, renewable, and cost-effective alternative to traditional fossil fuels for powering boats and RVs. It allows boaters and RVers to be off-grid, and it doesn’t produce emissions or noise. Solar power systems for boats and RVs include solar panels, charge controller, and a battery bank. There are different options for the solar panel such as flexible or traditional rigid solar panels.

Nova Scotia’s solar industry continues to soar at a record pace

Nova Scotia’s solar industry is growing. There was some uncertainty earlier this year when Nova Scotia Power proposed a fee for solar users, but after the government intervened, the solar sector saw another record-breaking year.

The solar industry in Nova Scotia is growing.

Each year for the past five to six years, the province has seen a record number of solar panel installations and there are now about 6,000 Nova Scotians with solar panels.

“With electricity prices rising, people see solar as a way to mitigate increases,” said David Brushett, chair of Solar Nova Scotia.

“Also, people care about the issues of climate change and see it as a way to take action to help reduce emissions.”

Another factor contributing to growth is the cost. Over the past decade, the price of solar panels has dropped nearly 90 percent.

“The sector has really progressed a lot over the last couple of years,” said Patrick Bateman, an energy sector consultant.

Bateman was one of the hundreds participating in the Atlantic Canada solar summit held at the Halifax Convention Centre this week. The conference offers those in the industry a chance to look at advancements in solar technology and discuss the sector’s future.

“Technology changes all the time so it’s of critical importance for people to get together, solve problems and create new opportunities,” said Bateman.

Growth in the province has largely been in the residential market, but there is hope that there will be growth in the commercial market next year.

David Miller, the director of clean electricity with the Department of Energy and Renewables, says growth in the commercial market was previously limited due to regulations but change is underway.

“Previously the max installed limit was 100 kilowatts, so it’s now 200 for some businesses and up to 1,000 for others,” he said.

In addition to that, there are new business deductions and tax incentives for businesses looking to go solar.

And while the price of solar has dropped significantly in recent years, the upfront cost is still too high for many and so the province is looking at community solar gardens as a way to make solar more accessible to all Nova Scotians.

“We’ll see larger solar projects constructed and allow individuals to subscribe to them, so you don’t have to own it, it doesn’t have to be on your roof,” he said.

“We see (this project as) opportunities to support lower-income families or middle-income families who might want to participate in the clean energy space but can’t afford that upfront cost.”

Nova Scotia has a goal of having 80 percent of its electricity come from renewable sources by 2030. While solar will play a role in this, the power generated by solar in the province is just a very small portion of what’s needed.

“Solar is a solution that you combine with other solutions,” said Bateman.

“Balancing solar with other existing resources is how we get to a cleaner future.”

 

Credits

More on LiFePO4 from GPT Chat Bot :)

LiFePO4, also known as lithium iron phosphate, is a type of lithium-ion battery that is commonly used in a wide range of applications, including electric vehicles, grid energy storage, and portable electronics.

One of the main advantages of LiFePO4 batteries is their high energy density, which means they can store a large amount of energy in a relatively small package. This makes them well-suited for use in electric vehicles, where space is often at a premium. Additionally, LiFePO4 batteries have a relatively long lifespan, with some manufacturers claiming that their batteries can last for over 20 years.

Another key benefit of LiFePO4 batteries is their safety. Unlike traditional lithium-ion batteries, which use a cobalt-based cathode, LiFePO4 batteries use an iron-based cathode. This makes them less susceptible to thermal runaway, a condition where a battery overheats and can potentially catch fire. Additionally, LiFePO4 batteries are less likely to experience voltage sag, a condition where the voltage drops rapidly during discharge.

In addition to the benefits above, LiFePO4 batteries also have some drawbacks. They are relatively heavy compared to other types of lithium-ion batteries, which can be a disadvantage for portable electronics. Additionally, they have a lower voltage than other types of lithium-ion batteries, which means they require more cells to achieve the same voltage.

In conclusion, LiFePO4 batteries are a type of lithium-ion battery that offers several benefits over traditional lithium-ion batteries. They have a high energy density, a long lifespan, and are relatively safe. They are commonly used in electric vehicles, grid energy storage, and portable electronics. However, they are relatively heavy and have a lower voltage than other types of lithium-ion batteries.

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